Women's International League for Peace & Freedom Collection

Women’s Museum of California Archives

Guide to Women's International League for Peace & Freedom Collection

Bulk Dates: 1931-1952

 

 

Collection Overview

Title: Women's International League for Peace & Freedom Collection, 1907-1965

            Accession Number: AC-004

            Creator: Unknown

            Prepared By: Thirada Kingphuang

            Head Archivist: Charla Wilson

            Date Acquired: unknown

Date Processed: October 1, 2014

Location: Women’s Museum of California San Diego, CA

Language: Collection material is in English

Extent: One box containing nine books, three circulate document, and three reports of the congress of Women's International League for Peace & Freedom 

 

Administrative Information

            Access Restrictions: Open to research

            Use Restrictions:  None

Provenance: Materials were found in folders organized to specific categories, in a box marked AC-004 W.I.L.P.F Box 1/1, by an unknown individual. No donor records exist or have been located. The records were appraised and then given to intern for processing. 

Historical Note

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) is a nonprofit, UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) accredited non-governmental organization; the longest standing women's peace group in the world. It is an all volunteer, and exclusively women’s organization that formed in April 1915, in Hague, Netherlands, by 1300 women from Europe and North America. Its founding members were from war-torn countries as well as neutral ones. A group of women came together for the purpose of protesting the killing and destruction of wars raging in Europe at the International Congress of Women conference.

Brief History of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) has been bringing women together from around the world since 1915. The WILPF is united in working for peaceful and non-violent means to promote social justice as well as political and economic change for all. The WILPF has crafted twenty resolutions in an attempt to bring warring nations to the peace table since its inception. The approach is always non-violent and uses existing international legal and political frameworks to achieve fundamental change in the way states conceptualize and address issues of gender, militarism, peace and security. The WILPF works to achieve peaceful means to prevent and end war, to ensure that women are represented at all levels in the peace-building process, to defend the human rights of women, and to promote social, economic, and political justice.

The first WILPF president, Jane Addams, was the founder of the Women’s Peace Party, which later became the US chapter of the WILPF. Two WILPF leaders have received the Nobel Peace Prize: Jane Addams, in 1931 and Emily Greene Balch in 1946.

The WILPF continues to be an active organization in the United States and around the world defending civil liberties, supporting the rights of conscientious objectors, and seeking the abrogation of unfair laws and practices that affect the welfare of minorities. Today, the WILPF works closely with the United Nations and other non-profit organizations on campaigns against land mines, nuclear disarmament, and other humanitarian concerns.

Summary of the Collection

Series I: Collection of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom collection of books, circulated documents, and reports spans the years 1907 to 1965. The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom collection contains nine books and four circulated documents about the atrocities of war, ways we can build peace to stop war, and how women can get involved in these efforts. It also contains three reports from the 4th, 5th, and 6th International Chapter Congress Meeting of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, including an introduction to the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, the attendee list, discussions about politics, war, and group photographs from each venue.

Container List: Box and Folder Material

Series # 1: Collection of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

Box # 1

Folder # 1 of 7: "Uncle Sam's Devils Island” by Phillip Grosser, 1931 (4 copies)

Folder # 2 of 7: Various Publications 1 of 2

                      : “International Conciliation”, official documents bearing upon the European war,

                          publish monthly by American Association for International Conciliation, October  

                          1914 No.83

                      : Teheran, Our Path in War and Peace” by Earl Browder, 1944

                      : “We come in Peace!” by Franklin Thomas, 1955

Folder # 3 of 7: Various Publications 2 of 2

                      : “Fighting for Freedom” by George H. Shoaf, March 23, 1907

                      : “Step to Peace, A Quaker view of US Foreign Policy”, 1951

                      : “Path to Freedom Through Nonviolence” by Ernst Schwarcz, 1959

                      : “New University Thought, Peace”, 1962 Vol.2, No. 3

Folder # 4 of 7: "Think", April 1946 Vol. 7, No. 4

Folder # 4 of 7: "The Correspondent" Special UN issue No. 34, Spring-Summer 1965

Folder # 5 of 7: 4th Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting  

                        Report, May 1 to 7, 1924 Washington

Folder # 5 of 7: 5th Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting

                        Report, July 8 to 15, 1926 Dublin (2 copies)

Folder # 6 of 7: Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting

                        Report, August 24th - 28th, 1929 Prague

Folder # 7 of 7: "The Last Weapon" by T. Wilson, 1930

Folder # 7 of 7: "How to Find Peace in a Changing World" by F. Bailes 1952

Scope and Contents of the Materials

Series # 1: Box # 1

Box 1 contains four copies of "Uncle Sam's Devils Island" by Phillip Grosser, 1931 in folder 1. This book is about experiences of a conscientious objector in America during the World War.

Box 1 also contains various publications, books and circulated documents in folder 2. The first is the “International Conciliation,” official documents bearing upon the European war, published monthly by the American Association for International Conciliation, October 1914 No.83. This circulated document promoted international peace, community relationships, and good fellowship between nations. Next is “Teheran, Our Path in War and Peace” by Earl Browder, written in 1944. This book is a about how to deal with rapid change in war. Last is “We come in Peace!” by Franklin Thomas, 1955.

Box 1 also contains various publications and books in folder 3. The first is “Fighting for Freedom” by George H. Shoaf, March 23, 1907 about freedom from the war. Next is “Step to Peace, a Quaker view of US Foreign Policy” by American Friends Service Committee, 1951. This book offers a way to approach peace. The third is “Path to Freedom Through Nonviolence” by Ernst Schwarcz, 1959. This book is about prevention of international war, including a study of East-West conflict and the methods of nonviolent resistance. The last is “New University Thought, Peace”, 1962 Vol.2, No. 3.

Box 1 also contains various circulated documents in folder 4. The first circulated document is "Think", April 1946 Vol. 7, No. 4. This is about keeping the peace of the world and the way of keeping the peace of the world. Next is "The Correspondent" Special UN issue No. 34, Spring-Summer 1965, and this is about critical dialogue and research about peace.

Box 1 also contains a report of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting in folder 5. The report is from the 4th Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting Report, May 1 to 7, 1924 Washington, D.C. This report is about the meeting, including informing about Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, attending list, and discussion topic about political, war, and post war.

Box 1 also contains two copies of the report of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting in folder 5. The report is from the 5th Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting Report, July 8 to 15, 1926, Dublin, Ireland. This report is about the meeting and uniting of women in all countries who were opposed to every kind of war, exploitation, and oppression.

Box 1 also contains a report from the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting in folder 6. The report is from the 6th Congress of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Meeting Report, August 24th - 28th, 1929, Prague, Czechoslovakia.

Box 1 also contains two books in folder 7. The first book is "The Last Weapon" by T. Wilson, 1930. The other book is "How to Find Peace in a Changing World" by F. Bailes 1952.

Women's International League for Peace & Freedom Collection